About this site

This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. It is the product of almost two decades of research and includes analyses, chronologies, historical documents, and interviews from the apartheid and post-apartheid eras.

Transparency International

According to Transparency International (TI) corruption declined slightly in 2006, although the country dropped five places on the TI's Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) On the Index South Africa scored 4.6, compared to 4.5 in 2005 but the country ranked 51st compared to 46th in 2005. I63 contrives were ranked in the survey. With a score of 4.6 SA failed the official test of 'honesty: as did all countries in Africa except for Botswana ranked   ( 5.6) and Mauritius ranked 42nd ( 5.1). (a perfectly 'honest ' country would score 10)

From: Guardian Unlimited, 29 January 2007

"The prosecution of leading politicians for corruption, the increasingly common demand for bribes by the police, and the massive wealth accumulated by some of those who wield power in post-apartheid South Africa have generated a growing public perception that graft and the abuse of office are increasingly widespread. According to a poll released at the World Economic Forum in Davos, 63 % of South Africans believe their leaders are dishonest.  Various high-profile cases have fuelled this perception.

Tony Yengeni, the former ANC speaker of Parliament, was sentenced to four years in prison for accepting bribes from a weapons manufacturer but released after only serving four months and greeted like a hero by ANC leaders. South Africa's police commissioner, Jackie Selebi, has maintained a close relationship with an organised crime boss, Glenn Agliotti, who is accused of the murder of a corrupt mining magnate, Brett Kebble. There is also a series of corruption investigations around the government and other individuals' involvement in a £4 billion arms deal and a British police inquiry into BAE's sale of aircraft to SA."

This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. Return to the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory site.